Communication 101

Three Levels of Communication 

There’s a popular book by John C Maxwell named Everyone Communicates, Few Connect.  After reading it, and from my experience in the marketplace nearly 15 years, I’m convinced that most people are not communicating well, although they think they are.  In fact, I would break down all communication into three categories which I will explain below.  I believe that most people never truly make it beyond the first category.  My belief is easily supported by the lack of harmony in the workplace, governments, and even in partnerships and marriages. Perhaps the hardest thing in life is to effectively communicate so that others not only understand what you are saying, but can logically and maybe even emotionally connect with what is said and take action.  Let’s explore what I believe are the three levels of communication.

  1. SAYING SOMETHING.  This is the most basic level of communication.  We all say things through speaking, writing, signing or some other form of communication.  Unfortunately, much of what we say is not necessarily heard, read, or seen, and much less is fully understood by our intended recipients. I cannot tell you how how many times I’ve asked an employee about some unfinished task or some other issue and was met with the reply, “I told him or her to do it…”. Therein lies the problem, just because something was said, does not mean that the message was understood well and acted upon.  I believe most communication falls within this first category- things are said, memos are written, laws are signed, but they are not effectively communicated so that the recipient understands the message.
  2. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION.  This level of communication occurs when a message is properly understood by the intended recipients and can be repeated back essentially verbatim to the person who originated the message.  I rarely see this in relationships or companies anymore.  We are so distracted by smart devices and screens in our cars, kitchens and even bathrooms that is is difficult to understand what is being communicated to us and even more difficult to understand the messages being conveyed.   Moreover, often the message being communicated doesn’t effectively state why the intended recipient should pay attention to the message.  Too often we ask people to do things without explaining exactly why it is important that they do it.  Without a sense of importance, no message will be effectively communicated.
  3. CONNECTION.  This is the ideal in regards to communication. Connection goes beyond just speaking and effectively communicating, it creates an emotional response in the recipient that causes him or her to reflect on what is being said and possibly take action. Martin Luther King Jr., John F. Kennedy, Socrates, Winston Churchill, Ayn Rand, Ralph W. Emerson and even Karl Marx and Hitler went beyond speaking to and communicating with people, they all connected with and influenced people on a high level.  The ultimate goal of any leader is to connect with people.  I believe this is the reason leadership is so difficult.  It’s very difficult to actually connect with people on a high level. It’s easy to “say something” or even have your message understood. Connection is hard.

 When you are speaking, writing or engaging in any form of communication, it may be useful to ask yourself, “What level of communication am I engaging in?” It could very well be that you think you are connecting with an audience, when in reality you are just speaking and what is being said is just as easily being ignored. It’s difficult to connect, especially in our very distracted world but connection is the key to building real relationships and creating massive action.  Connection is the ideal when communicating, although it is rarely achieved.  My suggestion would be to at least work on effectively communicating so that your recipients actually understand what you are saying and why you are saying it.  Too many words are wasted nowadays. Don’t let your words be wasted as well!      

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